Docker ERROR: Volume specifies nonexistent driver inmemory

According to the docs there is a ‘inmemory’ driver for docker volumes:
https://docs.docker.com/registry/storage-drivers/inmemory/

For purely tests purposes, you can use the inmemory storage driver.
This driver is an implementation of the storagedriver.StorageDriver
interface which uses local memory for object storage.

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  • But when trying to use it like so:

    volumes:
      ui-tmp-memory:
        driver: inmemory
    

    It gives me this output:

    Creating volume "myapp_ui-tmp-memory" with inmemory driver
    ERROR: Volume ui-tmp-memory specifies nonexistent driver inmemory
    

    Am I missing something or do I need to install “inmemory” driver somehow?

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  • One Solution collect form web for “Docker ERROR: Volume specifies nonexistent driver inmemory”

    The link you’ve provided points to storage drivers for Docker Registry. You seem to want to mount a volume in a container which would require a Docker Engine Volume Plugin. These are two distinct types of plugins for two different applications and aren’t interchangeable.

    You may be able to easily accomplish what you want by creating a RAM disk and using the Local Persist Plugin in Docker Engine.

    Docker will be the best open platform for developers and sysadmins to build, ship, and run distributed applications.